Category: Resources for Researchers

Resources for Educators Resources for Parents Resources for Researchers

Executive Function Issues: OCD

When children suffer from executive function issues, it can contribute to separate, but related, disorders. Children who have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often struggle with executive function (EF), such as the ability to shift their attention to a new idea once they get stuck in a repetitive cycle. A child with OCD won’t necessarily experience every…

Resources for Educators Resources for Parents Resources for Researchers

Strategies for Parents: Goldilocks Parenting

Reflection Sciences Co-founder Dr. Stephanie Carlson explains how “goldilocks parenting”, or finding techniques that are “just right” for a child’s autonomy development, affects the child’s executive function development. When parents interact with their child in a way that balances patience, helpfulness, and involvedness, the child develops the ability to reflection on choices and make decisions according to their own…

Resources for Clinicians Resources for Educators Resources for Parents Resources for Researchers

Executive Function Issues or Laziness?

This 2-part series by Dr. Lynn Margolies of Psych Central features the published work of Reflection Sciences Co-founder, Dr. Phil Zelazo. Part 1 of the series describes how Executive Function issues, the new “hot” umbrella term being used by teachers, counselors, and parents to describe an array of learning and attentional issues, differs from laziness. Part…

Resources for Clinicians Resources for Educators Resources for Parents Resources for Researchers

Executive Function + ADD and ADHD

Executive functions and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, or ADD and ADHD, often go hand-in-hand. In fact, when a doctor screens a patient for ADD and ADHD, deficiencies in executive functions are some of the most important signs they look for. There are several ways to examine for ADD and ADHD, but they all serve the same purpose:…

Resources for Clinicians Resources for Educators Resources for Parents Resources for Researchers

How to Close the Achievement Gap with Executive Function Training

In a Q & A with Chalkbeat Colorado at U Denver, Reflection Sciences Co-Founder Dr. Stephanie Carlson explains how we can help close the achievement gap and even the playing field for low-income children, starting with executive function brain-based skills. See the full interview here.

Resources for Clinicians Resources for Educators Resources for Parents Resources for Researchers

How the Batman Effect Impacts Executive Function + Child Development

In her research, Dr. Stephanie Carlson has been able to help children to improve their executive function skills by encouraging them to pretend to be someone more competent than themselves, like Batman. She talks about this phenomenon, called psychological distancing, in an interview with Ginny from the Understood.org Team. See the interview here!  

Resources for Educators Resources for Parents Resources for Researchers

Executive Function, Batman Effect and Pretend Play

Reflection Science’s Co-founder and Cheif Science Officer, Dr. Stephanie Carlson, explains key insights about how the Batman Effect and pretend play are important in developing a child’s working memory, executive function, flexible thinking, and impulse control. See the article here.

Resources for Educators Resources for Parents Resources for Researchers

Pretend Play, Imaginary Friends, + Executive Function

What does a child’s relationship with their imaginary friends say about them? In this episode of “The Real Guide to Imaginary Companions” by SciFri, Dr. Stephanie Carlson explains how pretend play can help children perform better in tasks of self-control and creativity. See the video here.